Bureaucracy

What you officially need in different countries. Visas? Climbing permits? Liason officers? Equipment restrictions? Customs regulations?

Visas:

Depending on where you go there will inevitably be bureaucracy of some kind. South America is unique in that visas are not usually required for British nationals and there is no formal requirement to register what you plan to do. This appears to be generally true for Alaska also, although for entry into any of the USA states a valid ESTA, available on-line on demand for a modest sum, is essential before you leave the UK. For most Asian countries a visa will be required. These are usually obtained in advance from either the relevant embassy or High Commission or, more commonly nowadays, through an official visa service.

Do NOT be tempted to use non-authorised visa services as these invariably charge more and are not necessarily any quicker. It is important to apply for visas in good time as not doing so can result in the application not being processed in time for your departure from the UK. At the present time India is likely to request a specific mountaineering visa (mountaineering or X-visa), and NOT a tourist visa, if you intend climbing in specified areas or peaks in excess of 6,000m. Visas of this type can only be obtained following receipt of a specific request from the Indian Mountaineering Foundation which is usually only available a short while before the expedition is due to leave the UK, so timing here is critical. Before you can even apply for a visa an invitational letter will be required if you wish to visit Russia and some of the former Russian states.

Find out well in advance whether or not this is obligatory for the country that you wish to visit. If it is then the in-country agent that you use to help with logistics should be able to provide it. Such invitations will require all the expedition participants to be named in advance.

Permits:

If you plan to visit an area covered by a National Park in India you will be expected to possess the relevant permit and to have paid the daily rate for that park. Unfortunately foreigners pay considerably more than Indian Nationals but that cannot be avoided. Such permits are usually organised in advance by your local in-country agent. For higher peaks and sensitive areas the Indian Mountaineering Foundation will demand a peak fee payable in advance by your agent (and effectively by your expedition). Such fees are set on a fixed scale and increment in 500m intervals from 5,500m and take into account the number of members in the party. In these instances after arriving in Delhi you will be required to visit the IMF offices for a briefing, to sign certain declarations and to meet your allocated Liaison Officer, for whom you will have hired gear from the IMF (in 2012 the cost for this was $500). The LO will accompany the party to base camp and may climb with you or stay at base camp until the return to Delhi. Generally the LOs are a help rather than hindrance but in addition to facilitating your expedition they are required to monitor your activities. A second visit to the IMF will be required before you depart for the UK.

The bureaucracy in most other countries is usually less complex than in India but in the Caucasus there are current restrictions on climbing on the border with Georgia. This eliminates climbing on mountains whose summits span the frontier.

 

The following was posted by Mick Fowler in October 2013

The Cost of New Peaks Between 6000m—7000m   (work unit:USD)

USD1000 WILL BE CHARGED FOR SOLO EXPEDITION FOR THE FOLLOWING MOUNTAINS:

MOUNT SAMDINGGANGSAR(6590m)-----------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 20

USD3,620/ PERSON             

MOUNT LUKTSE(6154m)--------------------------------------- MAXIMUM DAYS 20

USD3,280/ PERSON             

MOUNT KYITSE (6206m)--------------------------------------- MAXIMUM DAYS 20

USD3,180/ PERSON            

MOUNT JIANGSANGLAMO(6324m)-------------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 20

USD3,700/ PERSON            

MOUNT JEITONGSUSON(6244m)-----------------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 20

USD3,500/ PERSON            

IF GROUP ENTRY/EXIT FROM ZANGMU WILL BE CHARGED USD500/ MEMBER.

 

MOUNT MELUNGTSE( 7175m)--------------------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 40

USD3,650/ PERSON             

MOUNT LOBUCHE(7367m) ------------------------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 30

USD3,250/ PERSON             

MOUNT KARDAPHU(7283m) ----------------------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 30

USD5,200/ PERSON           

MOUNT KARTA GANGRI(7093m)-----------------------------MAXIMUM DAYS 40

USD4,900/PERSON+Virgin Peak fee US$13000

Cotract Rate:USD4,600/ PERSON+Virgin peak fee us$13000

IF GROUP ENTRY/EXIT FROM LHASA WILL BE CHARGED USD150/ MEMBER/DAY AND USD100/DAY/SHERPA .

NOTE:

USD50/ PERSON/ DAY WILL BE CHARGE IF THE EXPEDITION IS OVER THE ESTABLISHED DURATION.

 

THE COST FOR NEPALESE STAFF

USD3,000/ PERSON

ENVIRONMENTAL FEE

  1. USD 15 / PERSON FOR THE MOUNTAINS OF 7000M AND ABOVE
  2. USD 10 / PERSON FOR THE MOUNTAINS OF 6000M AND ABOVE

THE COST FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICE

  1. ABC & BC MEMBER                                      USD2, 600/PERSON
  2. TREKKER (MAXIMUM 15 DAYS IN TIBET)                  USD1, 500/ PERSON
  3. EXTRA YAK                                             USD200/ YAK
  4. SATELLITE PHONE PERMIT                               USD1,000

THE COST INCLUDES:

  1. PEAK PERMIT FEE.
  2. TRANSPORTATION FROM ZHANGMU (LHASA) TO BC AND BC TO ZHANGMU (LHASA). ONE JEEP FOR 4 PERSONS
  3. LIAISON OFFICER AND INTERPRETER
  4. FULL BOARD AND LODGING EN ROUTE.
  5. TICKETS FOR THREE SCENIC SPOTS : THE POTALA PALACE, THE JOKHANG TEMPLE AND,THE DREPUNG MONASTERY AND THE SERA MONASTERY.
  6. ROAD MAINTENANCE FEE
  7. 3 YAKS PER MEMBER FROM BC TO ABC AND 2 YAKS FROM ABC TO BC FOR THE OTHER MOUNTAINS
  8. 1 YAK PER SHERPA FROM BC TO ABC AND RETURN.
  9. 1 YAK PER ABC MEMBER AND BC MEMBER FROM BC TO ABC AND RETURN.
  10. 1 YAK CAN BE LOADED 40K.G IN SPRING AND 50 K.G IN AUTUMN

THE COST EXCLUDES:

FOOD AND TENTS AT BC AND ABOVE, PERSONAL EQUIPMENT AND SO ON.

THE PAYMENT SHOULD BE DONE BEFORE EXPEDITION’S ENTRY OF TIBET